Home > Becoming an Entrepreneur, Empowering Women, Leading Teams > A Story for Managing Change: Who knows what is good and what is bad?

A Story for Managing Change: Who knows what is good and what is bad?

A little over a year ago, I heard a short Taoist story (during CRR’s ORSC advanced team coach training).  Since then it changed my perspective in my business and life changes.  For example, when my middle son entered the army, it softened experiences for me and him.  Enabled me to look at events from the flow and global process.  More deeply.  Not divide up what’s happening into good or bad. Not hold on to ideas.  Or reject others.

I shared the story a couple of weeks ago with a group of women in business in Raanana.  To face business dilemmas in stride, as part of their overall process and goal.  It struck a chord with them too.

Third, in Haruki Murakami’s latest novel 1Q84 (that I just completed), I saw how the theme of not knowing what’s good and bad was a major part of the narrative and characters.  Well that’s a very LONG…. novel…  Which I recommend reading.  But today, I share the very SHORT… story with you!

Let me know how it changes your perspective and life…  It’s from The Tao Book and Card Pack by Timothy Freke:

“When an old  farmer’s stallion wins a prize at a country show, his neighbor calls round to congratulate him, but the farmer says, “Who knows what is good and what is bad?

The next day some thieves come and steal his valuable animal.  His neighbor comes to commiserate with him, but the old man replies, “Who knows what is good and what is bad?

A few days later the spirited stallion escapes from the thieves and joins a herd of wild mares, leading them back to the farm.  The neighbor calls to share the farmer’s joy, but the farmer says, “Who knows what is good and what is bad?” 

The following day, while trying to break in one of the wild mares, the farmer’s son is thrown and fractures his leg.  The neighbor calls to share the farmer’s sorrow, but the old man’s attitude remains the same as before.

The following week the army passes by, forcibly conscripting soldiers for a war, but they do not take the farmer’s son because he cannot walk. The neighbor thinks to himself, “Who knows what is good and what is bad?”

He realizes that the old farmer must be a Taoist sage.”

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